RSS   |  Contact  |  Advertise
You are not logged in.   LOGIN or REGISTER

Project Hope: Old Conflict, Fresh Take //

04.27.10
bydanah
When I saw an exhibit of graphic novels put together by children at a school in Nablus, I felt relieved that someone was approaching the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in a fresh way.


When I saw an exhibit of graphic novels put together by children at a school in Nablus, I felt relieved that someone was approaching the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in a fresh way. Using an aesthetic medium to express aspects of the conflict as opposed to stating facts makes people more likely to digest the information. It feels less like a lecture and more like an experience. The organization behind the exhibit in Beit Zatoun’s beautiful new space on Markham Street in Toronto was Project Hope, an NGO based in Nablus that aims to provide youth and children residing in conflict zones. They offer English and French language classes for children, as well as art and photography.

The children, with help from the volunteers, put much effort into the graphic novel work, which covered a variety of themes that really evoke the difficulties faced by children living within occupied Palestine. One young man told the story of failing his high school exams due to an injury from a shooting,  another depicted children reuniting at an orphanage — illustrating how occupation leads to separation. These graphic novels have been compiled into a book that will soon be available for sale at Beit Zatoun. To learn more about Project Hope, visit www.projecthope.ps >>

________________________________________________________________________________

About the Author: Danah Abdulla was not born in Canada but has lived here since the age of two. A Palestinian with a degree from the University of Ottawa in something other than Engineering (Mass Communications, minor Commerce), she lives in Toronto where she works as a Digital Cultivator for a big advertising agency. She’s a freelance writer and a blogger. She likes to doodle, read, make jokes, and dance.



Related posts:
    “Now That We Have Tasted Hope” by Khaled Mattawa width= “Now That We Have Tasted Hope” by Khaled Mattawa
    Susan Abulhawa’s <i>The Scar of David</i> width= Susan Abulhawa’s The Scar of David
    NYC EVENT: Lyrical Evolution width= NYC EVENT: Lyrical Evolution

Comments